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Archive (18)

Archive

Antics in the Wild 
The picturesque primates of Asia
Primates - which consist of monkeys, apes and more - have long bewildered our imaginations with their cheekiness, antics, similarities and human-like behaviour. This series of photos capture the simian race at their most human and picturesque, from travelling to sleeping to swimming and even group hugs.
BY CS LING

Protecting the Proboscis
A look at conserving the charismatic proboscis monkey
The proboscis monkey has received increasing attention in recent years. Indeed, it has become a flagship species for tourism activities throughout its range, particularly in popular areas like Sukau in Kinabatangan, Sabah. But the effects of increased tourism and human contact can lead to avoidance or habituation, neither of which are desirable.
BY JOHN SHA AND IKKI MATSUDA

The Plight of the Asian Colobines
Profiling Singapore’s banded leaf monkey and Vietnam’s Tonkin snub-nosed monkey
Asian colobines, or leaf-eating primates, are a diverse group with
at least 44 species recognised throughout the region. Highly endangered and living in remote forests, this article brings to light the plight of Singapore’s banded leaf monkey and Vietnam’s Tonkin snub- nosed monkey.
BY ANDIE ANG

Saving Gili’s Horses
Protecting the island’s cidomo taxi horses
Tourists flee from Bali to Lombok to the Gili islands in search of quieter beaches, unpaved roads and more authentic “local-ness”, but at what cost? Not enough is being done for the welfare of the cidomo or taxi horses, who transport not only tourists and their baggages, but construction material and rubbish waste.
BY CAROLYN OEI AND MARC NAIR

 The Allure of Paint
Depicting Malaysia’s natural heritage through painting 
When the boundaries between art and photography are blurred, the results are seen in the paintings of Adrian Ho, a Malaysian artist who rose to fame at the Singapore Biennale 2013 with his two paintings Fruits of Life and Full Production. Adrian speaks exclusively to ASIAN Geographic about his conservation efforts through wielding his paintbrush.
BY WAN PHING LIM

And Thereby Hangs a Tale 
Monkey fables from centuries of Asian folklore
Irrepressible, mischievous, 
resourceful yet eternally effervescent, the tale of the monkey is one that transcends continents, creeds, customs and centuries. In Asia, the monkey in his various guises has been venerated and deified perhaps even before 500 BC – from Sun Wukong, Hanuman and Sarutahiko Okami and its various adaptations in Myanmar, Indonesia and Thailand.
BY KHONG SWEE LIN

King and Queen of Kalimantan's Jungle
A Journey into Camp Leakey's Orangutan Centre
Travelling upriver against the Relentless, mocha-coloured current of Central Kalimantan’s Sekonyer River, all eyes are on the towering tapestry of rainforest trees above for a glimpse of Borneo's most iconic wildlife species - the orangutan. Follow as we journey into Camp Leakey to meet Tom and Tutu, the resident male and female orangutans.
BY TOMMY SCHULTZ

 
 
 
 
 
 
 

BY TOMMY SCHULTZ

Melting Earth
Caring for a Warming Planet
With the Earth’s temperatures rising at an alarming rate
and 2015 being the warmest year recorded on the planet, the melting of mountain glaciers and ice caps in the Arctic and Antarctic have been contributing to rising sea levels, as seen in these award-winning photos from the Global Arctic Awards 2015 Contest.
BY GLOBAL ARCTIC AWARDS

Islands in the Sky
An uncertain fate for the alpine tundra as the Earth warms
As the planet warms, the harsh conditions of the alpine zone are shrinking – where there was once ice, now there is green life. This process, analogous to the movement of vegetation towards the poles, is one direct manifestation of climate change.
BY YD BAR-NESS

Sulphur, the Earth’s coolant
A natural climate changer
Volcano eruptions are a natural cause of climate change. Particles can reach the stratosphere as far as 20 kilometres, releasing large volumes of sulphur dioxide (SO2) and carbon dioxide (CO2). It is here in Indonesia’s craters, from the Gunung Ijen in West Java to Gunung Kelimutu in Flores and Gunung Papandayan that we see nature’s way of bringing down the temperature.
BY CARL-BERND KAEHLIG

Above Sea Level
How climate change is affecting the indigenous fisherfolk of Malaysia
In the southwest of Malaysia, the artisanal Malay fishermen of Mukim Tanjung Kupang ply the narrow straits between Singapore and Malaysia in the Pendas and Pulai River estuaries of Johor. But over the last few decades, the winds have changed, the weather is erratic and even water patterns are strange, affecting the livelihoods of these indigenous fishermen.
BY SERINA RAHMAN

The Paris Climate Change Agreement
What does it mean for Singapore?
Since Singapore’s participation in the Paris Talks in November 2015, what action has been undertaken? Our writers report on the current situation of the small island-nation, including the effectiveness of the Earth Hour campaigns – a WWF-initiative based out of Singapore – and the lifestyle habits of excessive air-conditioning and Styrofoam food packaging.
BY CAROLYN OEI AND MARC NAIR

The Village and the Dam
How China’s race for hydroelectric power is displacing thousands in Cambodia
In this moving piece, Giorgio Taraschi travels to northern Cambodia to the villages of Kbal Romeas, Srae Sronok and Phluk to document the building of Hydrolancang’s Lower Sesan 2 (LSS2) dam and its effects on the locals – from the village monk to the community leader and the young and old who depend on the Mekong river for their livelihoods.
BY GIORGIO TARASCHI

Light for a Nation
Solar as a solution to rebuilding Nepal after the earthquakes
Toronto-based photojournalist Kristin Lau travels to rural Nepal after the April and May 2015 earthquakes that shook the nation and left the country in tatters. Her series of photos shed light on a charitable organisation, SunFarmer, who is helping to rebuild the nation by installing solar energy panels in schools, health posts and water wells in an effort to provide clean and affordable electricity.
BY KRISTIN LAU

 
 
 

 

Iraq through the Fall
Tears and Triumphs of the 2003 Iraq War
ASIAN Geographic pays tribute to Alexandra Boulat, one of the world’s most fearless female photojournalists and war documentary photographers. Her series of photos taken during the invasion of Iraq to topple Saddam Hussein’s regime shows us the tears and triumphs of war through the lives of civilians.
BY ALEXANDRA BOULAT

Land Before Time
New moth species discovered in Aceh, Indonesia
The discovery of a new moth species, the Endoclita fahringeri, in the mountains of Gunung Leuser in Sumatera, Indonesia, is proving to be a landmark in scientific history. The 300 million-year-old mountain range is where Alfred Fahringer discovered the species during his two-week trek in August 2014. He narrates his experience exclusively to ASIAN Geographic.
BY ALFRED FAHRINGER

Freya Stark, the Passionate Nomad
One woman’s influence on the Arab world
Dubbed the female Lawrence of Arabia, Dame Freya Stark (1893– 1993) was one of her generation’s most prolific female explorers, travelling through Syria, Iran, Iraq, Yemen and other Middle Eastern countries prior to the second world war. Here, we chart her influence and the roads she paved for others following in her footsteps.
BY SOPHIE IBBOTSON 

Women of Gaza
A life choked with adversity along the Gaza Strip
As with all Palestinians in what is often described as the world’s largest open air prison, life for the women of the Gaza Strip is choked with adversity. But journalist and photographer Lara Abu Ramadan strives to show Gaza’s human face to a world used to seeing scenes of catastrophe and violence.
BY NIGEL O’CONNOR

A Totem of Her Generation
Exploring women’s identities through Diana Lui’s photography
In this exclusive interview with ASIAN Geographic, Paris-based photographer Diana Lui speaks to us about the artistic and anthropological nature of her work, as seen through the large format portraits of modern-day women in Morocco, Tunisia and Malaysia. Taken on her 8x10 inch view camera, her portraits seek to explore the meaning and identity of contemporary Asian women.
BY WAN PHING LIM

India’s Pink War
The fight against women’s violence
They wear pink saris, wield sticks and don’t hesitate to use violence in their fight for women’s rights. These are the ladies of the Gulabi Gang, an association created by Sampat Pal Devi to eradicate gender violence in India, one of the countries in the world where women are often discriminated against even before birth. Founded in 2006, members who are mostly victims of domestic abuse now number over 400,000 across India.
BY ZIGOR ALDAMA AND MIGUEL CANDELA

Who was Sylvia?
Remembering Singapore’s Renaissance woman, Sylvia Kho (1917–2013)
In appreciation and retrospective on Singapore’s foremost bridal couturier and innovator in the arts of fashion, beauty and decoration, Sylvia Kho created a whole new industry centred around one of society’s most important rites of passage – the institution of marriage. A trendsetter and pioneering businesswoman, we look at her life and legacy.
BY KHONG SWEE LIN

Every Tribe, Every Nation
The First Travellers
In a three-year project that spanned 35 indigenous communities across the globe, this iconic artistic document known as ‘Before They Pass Away’ captures the authenticity and beauty of disappearing cultures in our world today.
BY JIMMY NELSON

Comets as Arks
Mysterious Travellers of the Solar System
In every society there are those who do not play by the rules, and who dream of taking long journeys of pilgrimage. In our Solar System, these maverick renegades are also the most mysterious; they are the comets that bring magic and wonder to our night skies.
BY YD BAR-NESS

The War on Wildlife
Ivan Carter’s Quest for Animal Conservation
Ivan Carter is the face behind Carter’s W.A.R., the latest television programme on Outdoor Channel Asia. On his visit to the Asian region, ASIAN Geographic talks to him about saving elephants from ivory poachers in South Africa’s Kruger National Park to investigating a tragic crocodile attack along the Zambezi River.
BY WAN PHING LIM

A Paranoid Nation
The Difference is Perspective
ASIAN Geographic travels to the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (DPRK) for “Bridges – Dialogues Towards a Culture of Peace”, and comes back with exclusive photos, an insider’s look and a totally different perspective of the often-dubbed Hermit Kingdom.
BY JUSTIN ONG

Pangaea, Dance of the Moving Continents
The Tale of A Shifting Earth
The lands of Earth are conducting a great slow dance – they come together and rift apart with titanic grace. Since the light rocks of the Pangaea continent separated from the heavier rocks of the oceanic crust, they have migrated around Earth in slowly shifting configurations. Today, we look at the familiar map and see the seemingly stable shapes of the land, but we are just catching a moment in a much more complex dance.
BY YD BAR-NESS

In Search of Sweet Success
The story of Fung A Pan and the Chinese cane reapers of British Guiana
The sugarcane reapers of the early 19th century contributed in no small measure to the community of British Guiana, just as Fung A Pan and other Chinese coolies did. This is the story of one man from Poon Ye in Canton who travelled to an unknown territory in South America, and the story of his descendants today spread far and wide across the globe.
BY KHONG SWEE LIN

Reviving the Ancient Silk Road
Kashgar as a key point in China’s ambitious plan
Once a cultural pillar of Central Asia and a key point in the legendary Silk Road, Kashgar is today undergoing a socio-political and economical facelift, even as the Chinese government is looking to revive the ancient commercial artery as a way of expanding its influence across the region.
BY ZIGOR ALDAMA

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